Tag: closing

Earnnest: the future of real estate transactions

Last March we introduced our partnership with Earnnest, a tool that allows for the fully digital transfer of funds (much like PayPal or Venmo) but made for real estate transactions! That means it was designed with safety and security in mind.

Earnnest provides a way for the digital transfer of client earnest money into the title company of your choice’s escrow account, verifies “good funds,” and distributes documentation of the payment and deposit to all parties.

How does it work?

The title company or the buyer’s agent can complete a request for earnest funds through the Earnnest app.  We are happy to complete this request on behalf of the realtor – just ask us!  In order to, we will need your buyer’s email, phone number, the property address, and the dollar amount. Your client will then receive a text and an email that “Tallgrass Title” is requesting funds.

     

Utilizing electronic methods of contract signing and delivery along with Earnnest allows your client’s new home to go under contract in minutes with zero travel and zero wire fees. The only cost associated with Earnnest is a $15 processing fee paid by clients when they complete the request.  With wire fees approaching $30 or $40, this saves you time and your client money.

What makes it secure?

Earnnest is partnered with the payment processor Dwolla, which sets up a secure connection between all parties with multiple levels of encryption. Earnnest uses Plaid to connect the buyer to their bank to complete the earnest money request and neither party obtains or stores your client’s bank account credentials or financial information.

It’s quick!

Once the buyer completes the request for earnest funds, all parties – the escrow company, the realtors involved, and the buyers – receive an email receipt verifying “Proof of Payment.” This tells us that the earnest money has been withdrawn from the buyers account, is verified as good funds, and is on its way!  Within 3 days, all parties will receive another receipt called “Proof of Deposit” – this tells us that the funds are officially in the hands of Tallgrass Title.  Contrary to how quick handing over a check seems, it isn’t always so fast.  Personal checks can take up to 10 days to clear the bank. Earnnest is the cleanest and quickest way to ensure the secure delivery of earnest money.

While entirely coincidental, adding Earnnest to our toolkit when we did was a gamechanger! Many of our everyday business practices have changed and we will continue to adapt as we move out of the Covid-era.  Adopting cutting edge tools for secure and paperless transactions will continue to be our standard.  We’re happy to utilize PaperlessCloser, CertifID, Dotloop, HelloSign, Earnnest, and another nifty product we’ll share with you in a couple of weeks that is going to make mobile transaction information and document access a reality.

Earnnest has even more to offer than we can cover here, if your curiosity is brimming, give us a call! Or you can check out Earnnest here! And if your client wants to complete their earnest deposit through Earnnest, we’d be happy to place the request for you or show you how!

 

Legals with Lippman – Part 2

Today we’re continuing our series Legals with Lippman!  In this series, our Production Manager, Sydney, focuses on topics related to real estate legal descriptions.  Sydney helps to make sense of plats (and replats), original townsites, water rights, condemnations, and how all of this affects you and your clients’ transactions.

Plats, Subdivisions, and Original Townsites, Oh my!

Of the three main survey systems, the Lot and Block System is one of the simplest. This system is often referred to as a plat and can further be referred to as a subdivision or original townsite. A Plat (also known as a plat map) is a record of a tract that takes a “metes and bounds” legal description and makes it into a simpler legal description, tied to a subdivision or original townsite. The Lot and Block system is often be used to identify individual lots, the block in which the lot is located, a reference to the platted land or subdivision name, and a description of the map’s recording information.

Many original townsites (like that of Manhattan as we see below) were created at the start of settlements when towns began to be formed. They are a simpler version of the subdivision plats seen today. They often give rough measurements of lots and blocks as well as setting out city roads and parks.

The Lot and Block system is one of the most recent used in the United States and became popular in the 19th century as cities expanded into surrounding farmland. Farmers and other owners of larger tracts of land would subdivide the property into a set of smaller lots to be sold individually. These subdivisions would then be filed with the county as a plat and often become known as subdivisions or neighborhoods.

Modern subdivisions have evolved quite a bit from the plat maps we see for original townsites. In addition to showing the individual lots, plats now include setback lines, easements, zoning, and other designations. This ensures that each lot has access to a public right of way as well as things like public utilities. An example of this can be seen in this recent plat of Rockenham Woods:

As you can see, the plat system has developed over time just like our towns and cities.  This continues to be for the purpose of keeping track identification simple. Stay tuned for the next Legals with Lippman to learn about replats and what that means for your land.  As always, if you’re brimming with curiosity about this topic or have a concern about a current transaction, give us a call!

Defining Deed Packets

Getting Deed Packets signed early is an essential part of the closing process. It helps your Closer calculate certain fees, pull payoffs if there are any, and makes it possible to verify information for post-closing tasks well in advance

There are quite a few documents in every deed packet and it might be difficult to remember what they all mean if your client asks, so today I will walk through our Deed Packets and what each document is used for.  As always, our team remains available to answer questions that you or your client might have about completing these documents. So don’t hesitate to give us a call!

Fraud Warning Fact Sheet

We use this form to make our clients aware of wire fraud and our partnership with CertifID to ensure that all wire instructions are verified and insured when the funds leave our office via wire transfer. Each statement will need to be read and initialed and then signed at the bottom.

Authorization for Release of Information (Payoff Requests)

This form allows us to request payoffs for existing mortgages in order to clear them at closing. The more information provided, the easier it is for the closing agent to obtain the payoff. Along with the signature line is a place to include the Sellers SSN and the date they signed the release.

1099 Tax Information Sheet

The top portion of this form will need to be filled out completely with the Seller’s Address, Phone number, and SSN or EIN. This will help us send out accurate 1099s the following January.

Proceeds Instruction Sheet

These are instructions for us to disburse the proceeds and how to get them to the Seller in the transaction. Once a selection has been made from the list we will need the form signed and returned with the rest of the packet. These instructions can always be changed by signing a new form with new instructions.

Authorization to Pay Commission

If there is a realtor, this one allows us to get the realtor paid at closing in the accurate commission amount as designated by the Agreement. It will need to be filled out whether there is a commission percentage or flat fee. If there is a Seller Realtor Admin fee, there is a place to include that as well and then it will be signed by both Seller and Listing Agent.

Homeowners Information Sheet

Not all packets will include this form. If the real estate is not located in a subdivision or we know that there are no HOAs in a certain subdivision, we will not include this. If it is in the packet, we will need to know if there are HOAs. If there are not, the “No” box will be checked and you can move to the next form. If there are HOAs then the “Yes” box will be checked; please complete as much of the HOA contact information as possible.

Authorization for Release of Information to Designated Realtor

This form will not change how we treat the transaction. Sellers have the option to direct us not to share their private information with the Buyers Realtor. If the top box is checked, directing us not to share information with anyone other than their realtor or lender, then we cannot and will not share a settlement statement with anyone, even those involved in the transaction, other than their realtor and lender.

NOTE: To prove commissions have been applied appropriately we can send a heavily redacted version of the ALTA settlement statement that only shows commission amounts and the Sellers signatures.

Covid-19 Notice of Possible Delays

This one is a notice that lets everyone know that there could be delays related to Covid-19 with getting documents recorded, back from recording and getting final policies issued.

Notary Instruction, Identification Verification and Notary Information and Certification

When documents are notarized, our office needs proof that the notary checked the identification of the signor and that the notary is in good standing with the state in which they are bonded in. It will also help in the event that we need to contact the notary if we have any questions regarding the notary’s information.

Affidavit as to Debts, Liens and Indemnity

This affidavit is a statement made by the seller that there are no liens or potential liens, or that no one holds an interest in the real estate that we would need to clear up prior to closing. This will need to be signed in front of a notary.

Limited Power of Attorney

We include a Limited Power of Attorney in all of our packets for Sellers to utilize. If signed it allows the realtor to sign settlement statements and any Buyer loan docs on behalf of the Seller. It is not required and is solely at the option of the Seller to sign.

Deed

The Deed varies as much as the transaction itself as to what kind of Deed is used to transfer the real estate. This will need to be signed by everyone who holds an interest in the real estate to complete a free and clear transfer. We hold the deed in our office until the transaction is closed and funds have been disbursed. At that time we record the deed with the county register of deeds to complete the transfer. The original will be sent to the buyer with the final loan policy.

In addition to the above, other documents may appear in a deed packet on a case by case basis.

Affidavit of Non-Production – Used to clear existing expired oil and gas liens.

Affidavit of Child Support or Spousal Maintenance – Used to clear divorce/child support cases.

Certificate of Trust – Used to prove the trustee signing has authority to sign.

Corporate Resolution – Used to prove the signor of a company has authority to sign on behalf of the company.

Affidavit of Death – Takes the place of a death certificate to clear title.

The earlier in the process we can get these documents signed and back to our office, the smoother we can make the whole closing process. Everyone in our office is a notary and we are more than happy to meet with clients to get Deed Packets signed.

We do offer a free courier service and can send someone to you to get everything signed if you just can’t get away. Just call our office and set an appointment for a time that works best for you.

Real Estate Property Taxes are Due Soon – Don’t Forget!

It’s property tax season! In Kansas, property taxes are due in arrears and paid twice a year. Taxes for the first half of the year are due December 20th of the current year; the second half of the year is due on May 10th of the following year. This means that unpaid taxes for the current year are considered delinquent as early as December 21st.

In order to avoid delinquency, we recommend paying before December 20th, otherwise you could encounter long lines or delays in processing your payment.  With varying restrictions due to Covid-19, be sure to contact your county treasurer in advance to see if an appointment is required to pay your bill or be sure to mail in your payment early enough to ensure it is postmarked prior to the due date.

Selling your real estate?

If your real estate is currently under contract, you may have very specific questions. Like, what if I am selling my real estate and the closing date is near the tax due date? How does our title company handle taxes? Do we pay them ourselves? Do we pay them at closing?

First, take a deep breathe. Then call your closing agent and ask them how they would prefer to handle the taxes.

If the closing date is prior to the due date your closing agent may prefer that you wait and pay the taxes through closing. If they are due after closing, they may encourage payment prior to closing to prevent late fees and penalties. Either way, if a payment is made your closing agent will need proof of payment in order to remove the payment from the settlement statement. Otherwise funds will be held in escrow and paid to the county by December 20th or refunded to the Seller upon proof of payment prior to December 20th.

How do I get proof of payment?

When paying taxes in the county office, the treasurer will provide you with a receipt for your payment. Hand deliver or email a copy to your closing agent and they will take care of the rest. If you mail in your payment, your closing agent can call the county and request the receipt.

If taxes are paid at closing, do I have to take the check to the county treasurer myself?

Nope, the title company will send a courier to the county and take care of getting them paid, you will not need to worry about the taxes getting paid we will take care of everything.

If you are unsure of next steps please feel free to reach out to our office. We can walk you through the process to make your closing as smooth and stress free as possible.

How Does Title Insurance Work?

Here at Tallgrass Title, we have discussed many topics about the nuts and bolts of real estate transactions: closings, probates, commitments, policies, etc.  But what is title insurance and how does it actually work?

Title insurance is essentially insurance that either insures that you actually own a tract of real estate and/or that a bank’s mortgage is valid and filed of record.  Title insurance, like other types of insurance, is governed by the individual state.  Insurance in Kansas is established and governed by state statutes that establish the types of insurance allowed to be sold in the state and various regulations governing the sale.  The major types are life, health, hazard, liability, property and title.  Further, Kansas Statutes establish the Kansas Insurance Department and Commissioner of Insurance. The Kansas Commissioner of Insurance is tasked with enforcing Kansas Statutes relating to insurance, licensing and regulating the sale of insurance.

When purchasing an insurance policy, an individual or entity enters into a contract with the insurance company.  The contract establishes the amount of coverage sold, the terms of the policy, exceptions to coverage and what constitutes a claim.  Kansas state law also establishes how fees are established and charged, how the money is accumulated, and who is entitled to the proceeds.  This ensures that when a claim (loss) happens, that the insurance company has retained sufficient funds to pay potential claims.  Otherwise, an unscrupulous company could sell policies and spend the premiums paid and then be without sufficient funds to pay a claim.  For example, if a consumer purchases a title policy insuring the person as an owner of the real estate with a policy amount of $100,000 and it is later shown that the property is actually owned by another party, a title insurance company is bound to pay up to the amount of $100,000 loss.  Now, there are a multitude of corrective measures and potential outcomes of any claim.  The bottom line is that a title insurance company is bound to hold a certain amount per $1000 of insurance sold for potential claims.

Kansas insurance statutes also require that reinsurance be purchased when a particular title insurance company’s “reserve” or “pool” is not large enough to cover the size of policy sold by the company.  This is done by purchasing reinsurance from another title company or other insurance company.  This protects the customer from an insurance company failing to have the reserves to cover certain sized policies.

In Kansas, most title insurance is sold through independent agents (including Tallgrass Title!).  An independent agent sells title insurance on behalf of a title insurance company, otherwise known as an underwriter.  An underwriter and independent agent enter into an agreement allowing the independent agent to sell its title policies with a certain division of the premiums.  Here at Tallgrass Title, we currently write title policies for three underwriters.  In our experience, each offers a unique product and the variety of options available allows us to better serve our customers.

In the end, title insurance is simply another form of coverage that specifically protects property rights.  Here at Tallgrass Title, we are proud to serve our customers in this regard.  This includes explaining any aspect of your real estate transaction or title policy.  If you have a question, feel free to ask one of our real estate professionals.  We love to talk title!

What’s the Timeline for Closing Your Deal?

Here at Tallgrass Title, once we receive the signed contract in our office, the clock starts ticking on our countdown to get everything out in a timely manner.  Our goal is to be efficient, friendly, and fast in all aspects of what we do, but, sometimes the fast part does not always happen as fast as we would like. We get asked often what the time frame is to close a transaction.  In most instances, we are able to say that we can have it done within 30 days. There are situations where that is not possible and there are situations we can close in as little as a few days. The following is a rough timeline of the steps we take to get transactions closed in order to give you an idea of the potential timeline for your unique closing.

Commitment

Within 24 – 48 hours of receiving a signed contract we try to have to commitment issued to all parties. This can take longer depending on whether additional research is needed to clear the title. Generally, this means tracking down additional documents to trace the chain of title or add exceptions.

Preliminary Documents

Once the commitment is sent out, the file is assigned a Closing Agent. Your Closing Agent will put together two preliminary packets: a Deed Packet and Buyer Documents. These packets will then be sent to the clients’ respective realtors or directly to the clients (if unrepresented) to get reviewed and signed prior to closing. Getting the preliminary packets signed and returned well in advance can help make the process smoother as we sometimes experience delays in the process of getting payoff instructions from lien holders.

Invoices and Payoffs

Once both of the preliminary packets have been sent out, the Closing Agent begins working on the preliminary settlement statements. With a cash transaction this can mean closing as soon as the deed packet and buyer docs have been returned, we receive any invoices and payoffs we need to obtain, and the buyer and seller are both ready to close. For a transaction that is being financed the process is a little longer. The lender has to disclose fees three days prior to closing, we need have underwriter approval or a “clear to close” status, and the bank has to have the property appraisal back.

Closing

Once we have everything in our office we need and the lender, if there is one, has received approval to close as well –what’s next? We will set up a time for closing either at the bank or in our office.

Cash Sale Closing

Buyers and Sellers may sign all their final documents electronically and certified funds can either be wired or dropped off at one of our offices.  After disbursement and recording the deed, the transaction is complete!

Financed Closing

When there is a mortgage involved, we ask you block off about an hour for closing as there are several documents to work through and sign. Once signing is complete, we will send the loan packet to the lender for funding authorization. Once we have authorization and all funds, we will disburse, record the deed and mortgage, and the transaction is complete.

We strive to make the closing process as smooth and easy (and quick) as we can.  Hopefully this gives you better picture of the timing of your unique transactions. We are here to facilitate everything and take the pressure off you and your clients. Please feel free to give us a call with any questions you have.

Different Types of Deeds and Interest

Quite frequently we are asked what deed is appropriate to transfer real estate in particular situations. The truth is there is not one deed for all transactions. There are different scenarios that require different verbiage to complete the transfer of real estate. Below is a brief explanation of what the different deed and interest types are and when they would be used in a real estate transaction.

Deeds

General Warranty Deed – A General Warranty Deed transfers real estate from one party to another.  Most importantly, the grantor is “warranting” that they own the real estate and guaranteeing that the grantee is receiving title to the real estate. It is the most commonly used deed and affords a grantee the grantor’s warranty of ownership..

Trustee’s Deed – A Trustee of a Trust in accordance with the Trust Agreement would sign a Trustee’s Deed to transfer real estate.  Again, most often Trustee’s deeds will appear as a warranty deed.

Administrator’s Deed – If the title holder passes away intestate (without a will) and the real estate is part of a court action, the Administrator may sign an Administrator’s Deed with permission from the court to transfer real estate.

Executor’s Deed – If the title holder passes away testate (with a will) and the real estate is part of a court action, the Executor may sign an Executor’s Deed to act in accordance with the Will of the decedent to transfer real estate.

Sheriff’s Deed – If the real estate being transferred was sold at a sheriff’s sale as part of a foreclosure or other civil procedure, a Sheriff will give a purchaser a Sheriff’s deed.  Such a deed will contain the specifics of how the sheriff gained the authority to make such a deed. 

Quitclaim Deed – A Quitclaim Deed is used when a party may have an interest that needs to be transferred to another party. The Grantor of the Quitclaim Deed is not Warranting that they have an interest, instead they are relinquishing any interest they may have.

Interest

Joint Tenancy with Right of Survivorship – When two parties own real estate together, if one were to pass away all their interest would transfer to the other party by filing a Death Certificate, Affidavit of Death, or filing the Will with the court.  Real Estate held between spouses is generally held as Joint Tenacy with Right of Survivorship.

Tenants in Common – When two parties own real estate together, if one were to pass away their interest would transfer to their heirs at law or by a will or other estate planning device.  This type of interest is common when two or more parties who are not married to each other own real estate together.

Life Estate – This is when a party retains an interest in the real estate for the duration of their life. They have the all the rights of use they would if they held title but only for the duration of their life. The real estate may be transferred to another party by the party holding the life estate but the tenancy terminates upon death of the original life estate holder.

Our team is knowledgeable and passionate about title insurance related inquiries. If you still have questions or would like more information, please do not hesitate to give us a call. We are here to help.

The Tallgrass Title Cinnamon Roll Vision Quest

After many debates around the office about the best bakery in the area, and more specifically, the best cinnamon rolls around, we decided to conduct an experiment.  I present to you the Tallgrass Title Cinnamon Roll Vision Quest.  In providing title services across the Flint Hills region, our staff has gotten into the habit of making pit stops for cinnamon rolls (and cookies and muffins…stay tuned) in the various towns we travel to and from to conduct title searches, perform mobile notary services, or deliver commission checks.  We decided to put the debate to rest and execute a super scientific analysis.

The Contenders

Alma Bakery and Sweet Shoppe, Alma
Sugar Creek Country Store, St. Marys
Friendship House, Wamego
Bluestem Bistro, Manhattan
Tasty Pastry, Clay Center
Kawffee Pot, St. George
Radina’s, Manhattan

Our Process

After sampling each cinnamon roll, our team completed a survey evaluating the specimen in regard to the flavor and quality of icing, roll density and flavor, the element of cinnamon (or lack thereof), appearance, and one’s personal desire to buy this cinnamon roll for their friends.

Our Findings

Best in Cinnamon-tography

Whereas many of the otherwise delicious cinnamon rolls we tested lacked a strong cinnamon flavor, the rolls from St. George’s Kawffee Pot possessed a delightful amount of cinnamon goo. These rolls also had a rich and flavorful icing with elements of vanilla and almond.  These were definitely the sweetest of the contenders; if you’re looking for a rich and dessert-like treat, Kawffee Pot is the way to go!  The rolls themselves were quite fluffy, moist, and flavorful.

The Heartiest

Radina’s and Bluestem Bistro, both located in Manhattan, served up the heartiest rolls we tried – maybe meals in themselves.  Both rolls were light, airy, and very fluffy!  Both less sweet than their rivals, Radina’s quality bread delivered a cinnamon roll that felt a little more appropriate for breakfast than dessert. Bluestem Bistro’s rolls were by far the fluffiest and most moist of our contenders.

Icing on the Cake!

The Alma Bakery and Sweet Shoppe and Sugar Creek in St. Marys both had such impeccable icing, our data collection resulted in a tie.  Thick, buttery, and perhaps sour cream-y, Sugar Creek delivered an outstanding icing that complimented their perfectly sized moist, albeit a bit dense, rolls.  Alma has stood out as a fan favorite around the office, in part due to their delicate, natural flavored icing paired with light and airy rolls with a strong cinnamon flavor.  These rolls didn’t last long around the office, what did last was the team scheming up reasons to drive to Alma for more.

Best in Show

Perfect and strategically located down the street from Tallgrass Title headquarters.  Our old faithful Friendship House cinnamon rolls.  Moist, light, and hearty cinnamon rolls with a perfect ratio of rich, buttery icing. And impeccably cute.  100% of respondents said these rolls were just right on sweetness, although there was some disagreement on whether they had quite enough cinnamon.

A Nutty Honorable Mention

A visit to Clay Center brought the Tasty Pastry into the competition. However, they were fresh out of cinnamon rolls that day.  Lucky for us, a local advised we check out the Nut Rolls.  Covered in scrumptious nuts with plenty of cinnamon, icing, and still in a roll shape! These treats might qualify more as donuts but trust me, they still won us over.

 

Here at Tallgrass Title, we’re happy to help with all your title insurance needs, it’s our job!  Feel free to contact our title professionals with questions arising with a current closing or general inquiries about title and escrow services.  We’re also happy to offer our recommendations for the best local treats and eats. …we’d like to think it’s our job!

Tips and Tricks for Submitting a New Order

How do I submit a new order and what info do I need?

Here at Tallgrass Title we are always happy to get new orders started for you and hope to make it as easy as possible.  To do this, we offer three simple ways to submit new orders or ask questions. Whether it be a contract, refinance, informational report, or preliminary title, any of these methods should cover you!

Email or Fax

A simple way to contact us is through email. A quick email to order@tallgrasstitleks.com is all it takes to get us started.  Whether it’s an order, a simple question, or preliminary title you are just getting started, we can get things going for you with minimal information. All it takes is a quick email.

We can also receive new orders through fax at (785)456–8581. Just send over your contract or title order form and we will get a file started for you!

Our Website

We can also receive new orders through our website: tallgrasstitleks.com! All it takes is to go to the website and follow the link on the main page to Submit Order or follow the Services drop down and click on “Get Started”.

This will lead you to an online fillable order form. Just fill this in, to the best of your ability, and hit submit at the bottom. The fields marked with an * will help guide you through required information.

We will receive your order like this and get a file started for you.

Just remember to include your name and contact information so we can contact you with any questions!

PaperlessCloser

Another way to submit a new order to us is through PaperlessCloser. Access to this program can be found on the main page of our website or through the Client Login drop down. This will direct you to the log on for PaperlessCloser. Once logged in there will be a button for New Order in the bottom right corner.

Fill in the fields with your information and hit Add Order. This will send your order directly to our system so we can get it started for you.

We can get pretty much anything started with an address or current owner so don’t let the details slow you down; feel free to submit what you have, and we will help you with the rest.  However, if you can provide information regarding the buyer or sellers marital status, that will help us immensely in the initial stages! For more information on placing orders or all things title insurance, feel free to give us a call or send an email! We are so happy to help.

Construction Hold-Open Commitments

The 2020 residential building season is now upon us!   Building season brings construction loans and the title concerns that come with this type of financing.   There can be concerns about the duplication of title services and costs that come along with it as well as insuring that the title to the real estate does not collect liens and other title issues prior to permanent financing.   At Tallgrass Title, we are pleased to offer a “construction hold-open” type commitment to assist in the construction of residential property.

Tallgrass Title is proud to say that we can assist in this area!

Q:  How is residential construction financed?

A:  People constructing a home will typically borrow money in order to finance the construction with a “construction loan.”  A construction loan is short term financing of real estate construction.  Generally, a construction loan is followed by long term financing called an “End Loan” that is issued upon completion of improvements.

Q:  Do both loans need title insurance?

A:  Because of the nature of a construction loan, Lenders are often concerned about the length of time a commitment is valid from its issuance.  Commonly, the commitment expires before the construction can be completed and  before going to end loan. To solve this issue, lenders will pay for a full title policy on the construction loan and then again on the end-loan.  The downside is that this creates duplicated costs.

How we can help:

Tallgrass Title is the only title insurance company in the area that offers a “Construction Hold-Open Commitment.”  A Construction Hold Open Commitment provides periodic updates of the construction loan commitment every 120 days keeping the title coverage valid until the end loan is closed.  Therefore, the costs are not duplicated between the construction loan and the end loan.

How to request:

Simply order a Construction Hold-Open Commitment from Tallgrass Title and we will perform the initial search and issue a Commitment for a $200 fee.  The Construction Hold-Open Commitment is then valid for 120 days from the Commitment Date and can be renewed for an additional 120 days with an update. We will perform two updates as part of the initial fee.  We will typically send out an update reminder when the expiration date is near. However, we do not perform updates without a request from the lender. After the second update, if further updates are required there will be an additional $50 fee per update. Construction Hold-opens can remain open indefinitely with the appropriate updates.

When the construction is complete and the mortgage is ready to go to End Loan or final policy we will do a final update at no additional charge. When the Final Mortgage is ready to be filed we collect the Premium and any Endorsement fees and record the New Mortgage. Our office must record the Mortgage and any other required documents with the Register of Deeds Office to ensure that the title is free and clear of any possible new liens. When the recorded documents come back from the county and all the requirements are met we will issue the Policy.

For those of you that use our Paperless Closer system, simply note that the loan is for new construction and type into the notes that you want a Construction Hold-Open Commitment.  If you prefer to email the order, please note the request on your order form.

Please contact our office if you have any questions!  We look forward to assisting you in the 2020 building season.